Miles Davis: Tokyo ’73 Compressed

This mix presents an edited version of the Miles Davis band’s fantastic performance in Tokyo, on June 19th, 1973. The mix (for an FM broadcast) is possibly the best from 1973.

Though not officially released, the recording is widely available in bootleg form – which is one reason I decided to edit its 91 minutes down 25% to a more album-like experience, lasting 70 minutes. If you need the whole show, it’s out there. If you have never, or have not recently, melted your face with 1973 Miles, then this mix is the blowtorch you need.

Overall, I sought momentum, and a balance of tension and release, with every minute being a thrill. In pursuit of those things, I sequenced the edits in a different order than the set list. (However, if you loop the mix, the last song segues into the first one.) If you want to know more about the aesthetic considerations, see the notes below the tracklist.

Every composition played is included (except for a passing glance at “Right Off”), but all of them have been shortened in some way(s), with the exception of “Ife.” 

Musicians:

  • Miles Davis - trumpet, organ
  • Dave Liebman - tenor and soprano saxophones
  • Pete Cosey - guitar, percussion
  • Reggie Lucas - guitar
  • Michael Henderson - electric bass guitar
  • James "Mtume" Heath - congas, rhythm box, table percussion
  • Al Foster - drums

70-minute mp3 mix zipped up here

  • Aghartha Prelude (5:48)
  • Zimbabwe (9:37)
  • Funk (7:17)
  • Unknown (5:57)
  • Turnaround Phrase (10:43)
  • Tune in 5 (8:38)
  • Ife (22:01)

Editing notes:

My edits were mainly motivated by the too-much-of-a-good-thing principle; less is theoretically more, from a repeat listening POV – or a one-time, stoned-out-of-your-mind encounter. 

In several cases, I omitted the conclusions of performances, which tended to be collective rave-ups on the theme that didn’t add much new information. Some of fusion jazz’s assumptions about a “rock” audience were incorrect. If you’ve explored the crap out a riff, you don’t have to come back and beat it to death before turning a corner. Be more like the Grateful Dead. (One "Sunshine Daydream" event per show is enough.)

I also reduced the number of times the music went down to a minimalist percussive hush. That kind of dramatic move isn’t needed more than once or twice during a listening arc. (Might have been fantastic, while watching the band live.)

And I made a few more surgical cuts, eliminating dull solo stretches that took away from the more incendiary parts of the performances. These edits are few. Mostly I shortened, rather than plastic surgerying. But I assure you that you prefer in advance this Aghartha edit that has the guitar solo jumping in right away. 

Cover based on a photograph by Christian Rose.

7 responses
Excited to dig into this. Thanks again for keeping all the music coming! Todd Carey Www.Twitter.Com/ToddCarey Www.Instagram.Com/ToddCarey Www.toddcareymusic.com Mgmt@ToddCareyMusic.Com > On Sep 2, 2020, at 6:56 PM, Posthaven Posts wrote: > > 
Love this blog & love the idea behind it (reconfiguration, angular takes on material, new fruition, more focus)... you really achieved something with your "one song/jam" compilation of GD material, the result is always on point and the compilation has internal flow and enough variation to be enjoyed not as a repository but as a proper album. Lovely made. My totally noob inputs for future comp/mixtape ideas: - read somewhere that some Keith era circa 74 jams point towards a "bitches brew" feeling while Brent circa 81 has more of a "jack johnson" feel. would be nice to ha ve a "two lp" comp or something that maybe can highlight this - a Wire comp companion with alt takes/bootleg/demos of the first three record run pink flag/chairs missing/154 - a classic krautrock compilation of jams/live with a spot for every major band thank you f.
f., thanks for this comment! The Keith vs. Brent/BB vs. JJ concept sounds challenging! I wonder if my 10/72 mixes and '79 Brent rehearsal mix kind of serve that purpose? Regarding Wire, I adore that stuff, but didn't "Behind the Curtain" cover the demos and alternates from the first three albums? If there's more studio bootleg stuff out there, I don't know about it. I'd love to do an all-jam Krautrock mix!
4 visitors upvoted this post.